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Implausible, Whimsical, Photographs

Eagle Nest Lake
(Composite)
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

Fake” photographs.  Famous Wildlife and Landscape photographer, Art Wolfe found himself in some controversy some years back with the cover of his book “Migrations,” where zebras were digitally pasted or blended (“photoshopped”) into a photograph. The thing is, he and this kind of thing is not unique (nor, in my mind, is there necessarily anything nefarious about it in the correct context).  These incidents, when they occur, re-ignite the long-lived debate about “truth in photography.”  Few viewers, would find my image of Eagle Nest Lake plausible.  It would be the first ever spotting of a whale breaching in a New Mexico mountain lake (really more of a pond, by Great Lakes’ standards).  And the scale of the balloon isn’t really believable.  This composite was made from 3 images, made years apart, with different media.  I did it for fun.

This post is all about manipulation, implausible edits and, for lack of a better term, “photoshopped” imagery

From almost the beginning of my blogging here, I have posited my thoughts on the use of “digital darkroom techniques” to “enhance” my own images (Get Real,  Has The Digital Medium Changed Everything?, and Photoshop Is Not Evil).  I think “truth” in anything is important.  But the real question is:  “what is the ‘truth’ and when is disclosure required?” That is – in my mind – a grey area.  There are some perhaps well-defined lines, of course.  But if I put a photo out there and do not disclose something I may have done and call it “art,” then disclosure, in my mind, is optional.  🙂

Balloon in New Mexico
(Composite)
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

Just to be clear, this post is all about manipulation, implausible edits and, for lack of a better term, “photoshopped” imagery.  I recently purchased and downloaded ON1 Photo Raw 2018, and have been scrabbling up the learning curve on this software.  A part of the software that has intrigued me is its “Layers” module. I had read about it and intended to experiment on my older copy of the software ((formerly called “OnOne Perfect Layers”).  One of the things I like about the ON1 folks is that they have provided plenty of online content (lots of U-tube videos) on techniques and examples, and one the them which piqued my interest was the ability to composite using their layers module.  Of course this is not really something new.  Photoshop has had layers for many versions, and compositing is commonly done using the Photoshop software.  What I was curious about, though, was whether ON1 made it easier.  I think it does (though PS CC keeps adding things and getting better and I know there is an algorithm in the newest update that allows for easier mask – selection for “fiddly” subjects).  The “Perfect Brush” feature in ON1 Layer’s masking brush, is really pretty cool.  It makes masking a relatively clean object really easy as it selectively chooses the pixels around the edge of the object and paints them only, without getting into the object itself.  On more detailed subjects, its utility is not as readily apparent, but I have been fooling around with blending modes, and in some cases, that seems to help (unfortunately, due to some technical issues, the ON1 experiment was ultimately a bust for me and I obtained a refund).

I think “truth” in anything is important … But the real question is:  “what is the ‘truth’ and when is disclosure required?”

The balloon against red rock image is a composite from two different images, photographed at separate times (in fact, years apart).  One is a film image and the other, digitally captured.  Both were shot in New Mexico.  “Perfect Brush” pretty much flawlessly painted the edges on this balloons.  It is “possible” that this scene could actually have ocurred.  It didn’t, but the image “happened” in my mind and then on my computer.  🙂

“Lost” in New Mexico
(Composite)
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

On my first trip to San Francisco, we were fortunate to be in town during an annual Navy event:  “Fleet Week.”  One week each fall, the Navy sails some of its ships into San Francisco Bay.  One of the highlights of Fleet Week is its air show.  We stood out in the athletic field just east of the Presidio and got some pretty amazing shots.  One of the things I tried – mostly unsuccessfully – to capture was the “bloom” when a fighter plane broke the sound barrier.  I captured just one that I was happy with; the fighter in the image here.  Obviously, this is not San Francisco Bay.  🙂  This use of “Perfect Brush” was a bit more challenging, as the bloom is pretty transparent, and shrouded the wings, making it difficult to find edges.  There were contrails off the end of each wing in the original image, and the bloom feathers out further.  I wasn’t able to make them look realistic, so I decided not to include them.  This is in a canyon in the Rio Grande and while I wouldn’t be surprised to hear a Navy pilot tell me s/he could do this, I think it is probably implausible. 🙂

Eagle In Rome
(Composite)
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

The base image in the Rome composite is one of my favorite images.  I was in the right place and time to catch this young man walking in this alley.  What was really serendipitous was the contemplative expression.  What was he thinking?  What was he looking at?  Could it have been his incredulity at seeing an American Bald Eagle flying through the alley above him?  🙂

If I put a photo out there and do not disclose something I may have done and call it “art,” then disclosure, in my mind, is optional

I have composited before.  The best example is the LightCentric Logo.  This was partly an experiment to play with the ON1 features, and partly an exercise in trying to find subjects there were either implausible together, or possible, but highly unlikely.  Perhaps sophomoric.  Perhaps a waste of bandwith here.  But thanks, Leslie Gore, for inspiring me with my frequent (but admittedly plagiarized – or close) exit line:  It’s My Blog and I’ll Post if (what) I Want to ….. 🙂

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3 Responses

  1. There have been a couple of great discussion about this on some of the photography blogs that I read. Mostly it comes down to intent. And, when does the mechanical craft of photography become art through some kind of creative post production? Photographers have done it for years in the darkroom. Some of the most iconic photographic names did their best work in a wet darkroom. Photoshop and all of its offspring have just made it easier. And, we don’t have to drink scotch in the dark any more. 🙂

  2. Interesting topic / view …

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