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Escanaba Area; (Update – “Photographing Michigan’s UP”)

Sturgeon River
Nahma; Michigan U.P.
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

Six years ago, I made my first gambit into “publishing.”  That word used to be a big deal.  These days?  Not so much.  With just a little initiative and some cash, anyone can now publish online.  So, in 2012, believing there was a need,  I published my first eBook, “PHOTOGRAPHING VERMONT’S FALL FOLIAGE.”  The book was the result of my personal experience with a dearth of current, useful information about “places” in Vermont that I had seen in print, but did not know how to find.  So I began keeping relatively detailed notes on my own shooting experience in the two places I have spent the most time in:  Vermont and the Michigan Upper Peninsula.  The book (now in its 2nd edition – 2017) seem to be relatively well received, and so, I decided to add the Michigan eBook, “PHOTOGRAPHING MICHIGAN’S UPPER PENINSULA,” to the mix.  By the time I was ready to pursue publication in earnest, I realized that my own personal experience was not enough.  Adding a co-author (done, now for both books) would at least double the coverage and give the reader not only more material but new and different insights.  With that in mind, Kerry Leibowitz and I co-authored and published the Michigan UP photography book (when a second edition will be in the outing remains to be seen).  Until that does occur, the best that I can do is to try to update readers with new information here, and hope it somehow gets “out there.”

The Munising area, with Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore and The Hiawatha N.F., still remains the “most bang for the buck” destination

The Michigan e-Book had a perhaps unbalanced focus on the northeastern U.P., particularly in the area between Munising and Paradise.  This encompasses much of the “Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore,” and the Hiawatha National Forest.  But my continuing research seems to support the proposition that this is still one of, if not the most fertile ground for the outdoor and landscape photographer.  There is just so much to shoot in a fairly compact area, that it remains the most “bang for the buck” destination, especially for a new visitor.

Having spent a lot of time in and around Munising, I only had a brief window to travel to the U.P. this fall and I wanted to explore some areas that I had only touched on and had not extensively explored.  The eBook has only coverage of Fayette State Park, and a couple nice waterfalls in this area (all of which I had visited on a short trip in late October, 2007).  So this year, I spent the better part of 3 and 1/2 days driving and exploring (and occasionally shooting) in the Escanaba area.  I’ll summarize some of my “findings” here.

Farm on Stonington Peninsula; Michigan U.P.
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

The area which I am calling “The Escanaba Area” is a part of the U.P., which is basically the south-central part of the main peninsula, nearly bordering on Wisconsin.  The area is bounded on the south by Lake Michigan.  To the east of Escanaba are two peninsulas, which extend south into Lake Michigan; the Stonington Peninsula, and the Garden Peninsula. Stonington is the first peninsula, to the east of Escanaba, and forms Little Bay De Noc and Big Bay De Noc, between the “mainland” and the peninsula.  My hastily planned trip had not included any particular destinations on this peninsula, but perhaps some driving and exploring.  I have a friend who has a cottage on the Stonington Peninsula, however, facing Escanaba, and I was able to stop and see him – and get some suggestions for possible shooting locations.  The bays De Noc and their peninsulas reach toward the iconically famous “Door” Peninsula of Wisconsin which forms Green Bay, in Lake Michigan.

Fayette State Park is a location definitely worth a stop

Originally, my primary focus was originally on the Garden Peninsula.  I arrived there on Friday afternoon.  “Garden” sounds awfully inviting.  I am not sure where the name comes from, but it is really not anything unique as far as Michigan goes.  Fayette State Park (an old iron smelting operation in the late 1800’s) is a few miles down the west side of the peninsula.  The area was preserved as a State Park in 1959, and the grounds are nicely kept.  Most of the old buildings, including brick blast furnaces, some housing, and timbers in the area where the ore boats docked, have been preserved.  Most of the trees around the park, including up on the bluff behind the harbor, are Beech, Birch and other varieties, which tend to turn a bit later and last a bit longer than the more colorful Maples.  They are more yellow, rust and orange in coloration, but still provide a nice photographic opportunity.  There are a couple very large maples on the grounds near the furnaces that seem to also turn later.  Most of the U.P. was well past peak the weekend I was there.  The harbor, called “Snail Shell Harbor,” is a harbor of refuge on Lake Michigan and has a nice modern harbor which can hold just a few boats at a time.  My shot of the old crib timbers was made from the modern harbor, and is one of my favorite “U.P.” Images.

Fayette State Park, Michigan U.P. – Copyright 2007 Andy Richards

The drive down to Fayette State Park begins at the small community of Garden Corners, at the northern base of the peninsula, where U.S. 2 intersects with MI 183.  As you follow down toward the park, you pass through the town of Garden.  It appears to be a mix of farm and summer dwellers, and there is nice harbor – Garden Bay – that the town borders.  Wikipedia notes that it has a year-round population of less than 1,000 people, and the median income is well below the U.S. officially published “poverty” line.  As I approached Garden, I was greeted by the bittersweet view of one of the near-ubiquitous “Wind Farms,” that have cropped up over the State of Michigan.   I am certainly cognizant of the desirability of cultivating renewable energy resources.  And where there is water, there is wind.  At the same time, It is hard to see these massive, whirly-gig, towers as bucholic or photogenic.  Form subsequent research, I learned that this was the first wind farm in the U.P.  It has been the subject of some controversy, and appears at the moment, to be the only such farm in the U.P.

Unfortunately, I saw very little sun and experienced mostly grey, dreary sky and drizzle for most of the weekend.  While overcast conditions can sometimes enhance colors, in my opinion, there is only so much you can do without including the sky in landscape photos.  So This weekend would not turn out to be very good for shooting.  I drove the perimeter of the Garden Peninsula, including a stop at Fayette State Park.  By this time of year, the park is essentially closed up for the season (although I think it was still “officially” open), and almost deserted.  That is actually a good thing for a photographer.  I briefly walked parts of the park, and confirmed in my mind that this is a location definitely worth a stop.  I took a couple cross-roads, also, as thought I had recalled some “long view” farm scenes which might reveal some fall color as well as views of the lake in the background.  It may well be that inhabitants of the area could tel me otherwise, but I did not find anything really worth a stop on the balance of the peninsula.

Farm Scene; Stonington Peninsula; Michigan U.P.
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

The Stonington Peninsula, however, revealed several worthwhile items and some rather picturesque driving, particularly along the eastern side of the the peninsula.  Though not necessarily providing the “long view” of Lake Michigan in the background, there were – nonetheless – some nice farm views.  Had the weather been more inviting, I might have spent more time exploring some of the side roads and shooting.

View From Farmer’s Dock
Stonington, MI
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

My first “stop” in Stonington was provided by my friend who had the cottage nearby.  There is a public boat launch just south of the small community of Stonington, called the Farmer’s Dock.  There is a nice rock bluff to the northeast across the water, that was nicely lit by the only sunrise I saw all weekend.  Saturday morning turned out to have some early sun and then some late sun, alas with the same cloudy, dreary conditions in between.  My research told me that sunrise was around 8:00 a.m. (one of the positives of fall shooting is that the days are shorter – which means the mornings aren’t so awfully early 🙂 ).  My hotel was about 45 minutes from the dock, so I left at 7:00.  The dock is just under 14 miles down Delta County Road 513, from the intersection of U.S. 2, east of Rapid River.  The boat launch entry is on Swede 13 Road.  While I cannot say this is a recommended destination, if you are in the area, it has some promise.

After the sunrise, I headed across the peninsula, in search of a “tunnel of trees” my friend also recommended.  About 2 miles back north from the Swede 13 Road intersection, on CR 513, you come to the intersection of CR513 and Old K10 17 Road (approximately 12 miles south from U.S. 2).  K10 will take you east across the peninsula.  In about 6 miles, you will cross County Road 511.  In about another mile, you will turn south and after about another mile, east again.  At some point the road will have changed from pavement to gravel.  As you round the bend, you will see the tree tunnel, which appears to go on for about 2 more miles.  Colors were mostly yellow, gold and orange.  But it is an impressive tunnel.

Tree Tunnel
Stonington Peninsula
Michigan U.P.
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

I drove a few more of the back roads on this part of the Peninsula, but really didn’t find much else to photograph. There are lots of “curve in the road” shots, but none that really got me excited. I did follow County Road 513 to its southern end, on Peninsula Point, where the Peninsula Point Light stands. It is not a particularly noteworthy or photogenic light, and I did not even take a “record” image. For the lighthouse hunters out there, it may be worth the drive, though the last mile or two is a narrow 2-track.

Stonington Peninsula
Michigan U.P.
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

I drove up the eastern side of the Peninsula during the balance of the morning, and then down the coastline along Lake Michigan to the historic town of Nahma.  County Road 513 goes nearly the entire length of the peninsula, and to the north, is where I found some nice farm scenes.  Again, the poor shooting conditions meant that I didn’t make as many stop, nor explore the side roads as much as I might otherwise have done.

Farm; Stonington Peninsula
Michigan U.P.
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

My morning ended by visiting the so-called historic town of Nahma.  While it may have some charm in the busy summer months, there was little going on there this afternoon.  They do have some pretty well preserved natural areas.  I stopped a couple times along the Sturgeon River, which empties into Lake Michigan just west of the little downtown.  The opening image was made there.

I spent my afternoon driving up the Hiawatha National Forest Road H-13, up to just south of Munising.  The sun peaked out for an hour or so that afternoon and I visited the old haunts: Pete’s Lake, Mocassin Lake, Counsel and Red Jack Lakes.  Hot afternoon sun made any shooting pointless, but I was able to confirm that they still hold their place as premier shooting destinations.

Headed back toward Escanaba, I decided to find a rather difficult to find, waterfall; Whitefish Falls on the way home.  I was able to find it, and discovered some significant changes, which I will discuss in an upcoming blog.  I finished the day at the National Forest Campground boat ramp back on the Stonington Peninsula.  The entrance to this boat ramp is  just 2 miles south of U.S. 2 on County Road 13.  There was some nice color there, but I was really too late for any good sunlight for shooting.  But Mother Nature obliged me with the only sunset I saw all weekend.

Sunset; Little Bay De Noc
Stonington Peninsula
Michigan U.P.
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

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