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Day Two in County Cork

Tourism; Celebrity Cruises
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Our overnight stay in Cobh, gave us the unique opportunity to plan two days. We knew exploring Cobh would be a day’s activity, and it made sense for us to “play it by ear,” and do that on our first day, depending on our arrival time and knowing we had later flexibility. I had made the most of my shooting the day before, and as we had an early appointment that morning, I elected not to try to go ashore for the early morning sun. But I was able to make some images from the ship. The military (naval, I think) facility was actually an island directly across from our stateroom balcony.

Military Facility
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

I work hard most of the time to keep people either completely out of the image, or just a small – perspective-giving – part of the image. But the opening image of the camera-wielding tourist (no, not a selfie πŸ™‚ ) underscores that as hard as I work to isolate images and find quiet places, tourism is a huge business and there are very few places like this in the world where there aren’t people – from all over the world – everywhere.

Blarney Castle
Cork, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

The two primary attractions for us in County Cork (after Cobh) were Cork City and Blarney Castle. Unfortunately, we did not do Cork the way we should have and learned later that we had missed a very neat part of the city. We did find a couple local pubs, a candy factory, and a nice church.

Blarney Castle
Cork, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

But Blarney Castle was our primary destination. My wife has become a pretty seasoned and expert travel planner, and based on her research, we knew there would be long lines to get into this very popular attraction. And, once inside, there would be additionally long lines to climb to the top, and to kiss the famous “Blarney Stone.” Her intel told us the best plan was to get to the Castle just before it opened. We didn’t want to depend on the train or finding our way to the castle from the Cork station, so she arranged for a taxi to pick us up at the Cobh port and take us to Blarney Castle. It was a well-informed decision, and we only waited about 10 minutes before we were inside the grounds. We headed straight for the turret and there was no wait to climb the steep, circular stone stairs to the top, and only about a 5 minute wait for the one person in our group who actually kissed the stone. I am told that one of the “blessings” the stone gives is “the gift of gab.” Most who know me will attest to the fact that I didn’t need that blessing :-). Of course, in order to see and kiss it you have to lay on your back while two “spotters” hold you nearly upside down, from a considerable height.

The Blarney Stone
Blarney Castle
Cork, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

From the top of the castle, the vantage point gave a pretty good “birds-eye” view (see what I did there? πŸ™‚ ) of the surrounding countryside.

Views from Blarney Castle
Cork, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

The details and construction of these thousand-plus year old castles is amazing, right down to the use of stained glass windows.

Stained Glass
Blarney Castle
Cork, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

We spent a few hours walking the grounds, which included a beautiful Gothic Stone house (which is actually owned and occasionally occupied by a private family), nice gardens, stables, and lawns. I was able to make (I think) some nice images of the grounds and the castle.

Home on Blarney Castle Grounds
Blarney Castle
Cork, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Gothic Home on Grounds
Blarney Castle
Cork, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

As I noted at the beginning, we really didn’t get to see much of the city of Cork. We only really had a couple hours following the Blarney Castle tour to get back to the ship. Our taxi driver happened to know the owners of a confectionary and took us there, just a few blocks from the city center. Unfortunately, the owner – though there – was not actively making candy at the time. After buying some sweets, we made our way back to the city center.

Linehan Confectioners
Cork, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

We walked around a bit. It was like many others that we have visited, with pubs, coffee shops (of course, a Starbucks), and other touristy things. We learned later that there was a city tour of part of the old city of Cork that was pretty nice. Perhaps next trip.

Cork, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Returning to the ship was a bit of an adventure. The walk to the rail station turned out to be much longer than we had anticipated, and we then had to figure out which train to board. Fortunately the crowds were small and we were in the company of lots of other folks heading the same direction. It was raining steadily when we arrived, and fortunately, the train platform was almost directly across the dock from the ship. Another good day in Ireland, and our last. We would head now to London, Paris, Bruges and Amsterdam.

As we returned to the ship the previous night, I was able to make a nice image of the approach to our Cruise Ship mooring. Tourism has certainly become an economic boon to many places and has grown (in some cases out of control) exponentially in the last 10 years. Cobh was clearly no exception and they made it clear that they welcomed the influx.

Cruise Port
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

In my mind Ireland was the best part of the trip and even a little bit magical. I have little doubt that we will return to Ireland one day very soon!

 

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The Irish Adventure Continues; Cobh

Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Our short, but eventful trip to Liverpool over, we headed back to Ireland for an overnight stay in County Cork. Cobh is the port nearest Cork City. Having now spent many days exploring parts of the Emerald Isle, in 2014 and on this trip, I have yet to find anyplace in this part of the world that isn’t simply remarkable. And as beautiful as we found Northern Ireland, Cobh may well have been its nearest rival.

I have yet to find anyplace in The Emerald Isle that isn’t simply remarkably photogenic

This was the second of three overnight stops on this cruise – an unusual event for us. Generally one overnight seems to be the norm, and it is often at the beginning or end of the cruise. So this was a bonus, allowing us to do some additional things. Our first day, we mostly walked around Cobh, taking in some local pubs, the Titanic Exhibit, the scenery, and a local restaurant for dinner.

Cork/Cobh Pilot Boat
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Cobh is at once, touristy and quaint and – much like Galway was in 2014 – very photogenic. It began with our sunrise entrance into the harbor, where from the ship deck, we got spectacular views of the bucolic Irish countryside. To our east, as we entered the harbor, I was treated to farms and a wonderful lighthouse at the head, in the early morning fog.

Light House
Cobh Port, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

I have often commented here that traveling by cruise ship has its pros and cons. One of the pros, is the vantage point we often get from the ship deck, both entering and departing harbors, and often while docked, as can be seen from the unique vantage point in the opening image. Cobh is a great example, and we were able to view it as the early morning sun did its thing.

Lighthouse
Cobh Port, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

But once you go ashore, you see that there is a lot see and to photograph.

Tanker Dock
Cobh Port, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

The little town of Cobh is barely two main streets, built into the side of the hills along the seaport. Catering to tourists and visitors, there is a train to Cork (the major city in County Cork, where Cobh lies), and restaurants along the quay.

Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

The downtown center has a few lively pubs, and the buildings lining the street are quaint, but colorful. Like any place relying on tourism, there are a number of closed up buildings, but all is well-kept.

Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Like I almost always do, I did some pre-trip research and had at least one specific image I wanted to make. I know that an image like the row houses, which is basically the first image you will see if you “GOOGLE” “Cobh, Ireland,” is the hackneyed iconic image. I have many times been (correctly) urged to “make my own image.” Well, I kind of did :-). I looked at the row houses from many different viewpoints as I hiked up and down the steep hills.

“Deck of Cards”
Row Houses
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

“Deck of Cards” Row Houses
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

I finally nearly gave up, but stopped a very friendly lady on the street, walking with her grandson and asked her about the spot the image is made. The people of Ireland are absolutely the most friendly people on earth, by the way. She told me it was right on the street in front of the houses. Well I thought I had tried that, but she told me I had not gone far enough and that there was a little (unmarked) park in the middle of the street. I went back, saw the entrance, walked in, and turn around. And, like so many of these iconic images, there it was! Local – or experienced knowledge counts. She also told me that the row houses are referred to as “The Deck of Cards.”

“Deck of Cards”
Row Houses
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

“Deck of Cards”
Row Houses
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Along the way, I found some other nice views of the area, including The Bishop’s Residence.

Bishop’s Residence
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Even though Cobh appears to be a busy little seaport town, and our cruise ship had just unloaded some 2,000 plus additional inhabitants, it was surprisingly quiet, once you ventured off the main square.

Cobh Waterfront
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

As is often the case, the showcase architecture of the town was the Roman Catholic Church up the hill; St. Colman’s Cathedral (a/k/a Cobh Cathedral). It can be photographed from several viewpoints. As most here know, I generally carry the diminutive little (redundant much? πŸ™‚ ) Sony x100iv as my travel camera.

St. Colman’s Cathedral
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

One of its shortcomings is that there is a limit at both ends (24 – 70 equivalent). Another is that it is really not made for architectural imagery, and I often find myself liberally applying perspective corrections in Photoshop. So though these may not be the “seen” images, they are still illustrative of some pretty impressive Gothic architecture.

St. Colman’s Cathedral
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

St. Colman’s Cathedral
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Benches outside of
St. Colman’s Cathedral
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Back in town, we had tickets to the Titanic Exhibit. Registered in Liverpool, built in Belfast, the reputed final stop of the RMS Titanic was Cobh. The exibit was short and interesting.

Titanic Exhibit
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

The museum has a picture of the rear of the Titanic in the drydock we saw in Belfast. The 3 screws are massive.

RMS Titanic
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

There were 3 classes of passenger on all the White Star Line ships: First Class, Second Class and Third Class. Inside the museum, there were replicas of staterooms and the general room, occupied by third class passengers. The capacity for third class was about 1000 people, so you can see the rooms must have been pretty crowded.

Third Class Accommodations
Titanic
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

“General Room”
Titanic
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

First Class Accomodations
Titanic
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

We used the Rob Roy Pub as our guide point and meeting place when we split our group a couple times. They were obviously ready to welcome us.

Rob Roy Pub
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Celebrity Reflection Welcome Sign;
Rob Roy Pub
Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Walking back to the ship, we were able to continue to see nice views of this great little town. Our cruise ship in the background gives some perspective of the approach.

Cobh, Ireland
Copyright Andy Richards 2019