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Here We Go Again (It’s Fall!)

Second Edition!

Here we go again.  It’s fall foliage photography season.  Are you ready?

Reflections; Cascade River, Minnesota

Over the nearly 10 years since I started blogging here, I must have blogged about fall color and foliage a dozen times.  Maybe More. Not surprisingly, it remains a favorite subject for me.  For some who are fortunate enough to have great foliage photo-ops in their backyard, what I will say here may not apply. But for perhaps the vast majority of us, these opportunities often come only after travel to a more aesthetically accommodating venue.

Somesville Town Hall and Bridge
Somesville, Maine
Copyright Andy Richards 2009

I have traveled to New England (prominently: Vermont), the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, Maine, Minnesota, West Virginia, Virginia and New Mexico, in various years, to photograph fall color. Vermont has long been a love of mine, and I have made numerous trips there; enough to prompt me to take my first foray into “publishing” with the first edition of “Photographing Vermont’s Fall Foliage” in 2012.

As the previous blog notes, I am very happy to announce the 2nd Edition of this book, with updates and substantial additional locations (the first edition is no longer available, as the sellers required that it be removed from circulation in order to sell subsequent editions). The New Edition is currently available on Amazon, Apple, in the iBookstore, and Kobo.

Maple Leaf
Stowe, Vermont
Copyright Andy Richards 2005

Many of the persons I communicate with at this time of the year are primarily leaf peepers with cameras. For those folks, go and enjoy! For serious photographers, I want to make a few observations, based on my own travel experience.

Miner’s Castle; Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore
Michigan U.P.
Copyright 2012 Andy Richards

Preparation is Key

Mental preparation is the most important piece of this. Just because it is fall foliage season, doesn’t mean the rules for good photography change :-). It is important to be thoroughly familiar with the gear you will be using, as the “window” for a great image is often very short, and you may only have one chance to visit the location. In 2010, prior to my planned week-long trip to Vermont, I hit a milestone of sorts, in my own photography.  I had always planned my locations and tried to find as much “intel” about a location as I could.  But this time, I focused less on those details, and instead gave some contemplative thought to what I wanted to present visually, emotionally, and artistically.  I think this contributed to one of my most successful trips.

Hiawatha NF Color Sections
Michigan U.P.
Copyright 2012 Andy Richards

What you can take on a trip is also always a consideration. When I shoot near home, or somewhere I can drive to, the photographic gear I will take is generally only limited by what I own (and can afford).  When flying, you really have to consider weight, and bulk. Most of us do not feel comfortable checking a bag with photo gear in it for a number of reasons. So what can you carry on, along with your other needs?  One of the miracles of modern technology is the ability to make great images with a lighter, simpler gearset.  For “casual” travel (I define that as any travel I do that is not specifically and solely dedicated to photography), I now carry a very small, packable carbon fiber tripod and the RXSony 100 iv (a point & shoot sized camera, with some professional credentials).  Even when I go on a dedicated photo shoot, the camera, lenses and tripod are much small and lighter than in the past.

Glade Creek Gristmill
Babcock State Park, WV
Copyright 2011 Andy Richards

A better question might be “what lens will you use?”

Photographic gear is a subject that is often over-thought, in my opinion.  Cameras, lenses, filters, and accessories are — for sure — tools that are necessary to the making of an image.  And there is no doubt that higher quality tools can render a technically better result.  If that is what you seek.  I have already read, several times recently, the question:  “what is the best lens for foliage photography?”  I don’t think there is a “correct” answer to that question.  A better question might be “what lens will you use?”

Tahquamenon Falls
Michigan Upper Peninsula
Copyright 2004 Andy Richards

However, that there are other considerations that will have a more direct bearing on the successful image.  Understanding light, and composition will have much more effect on imagery, in my view, than any other factor.  This assumes, of course, that you already have a solid grounding on exposure principles, how to focus the camera, and considerations of aperture and depth of field.  This relates directly back to the first point:  preparation.  If you do not come to your subject in the best light, it will be difficult to make a really great image.  More often than not, this means early and late (or–think:  during breakfast and supper :-)).  Much of my more recent travel has centered around other activities, such as family time, tours, etc.  While I do make images, it is often apparent that they were not take in the “best” light, and I frequently lament that it would be nice to be at a location either very early or in the late afternoon/early evening.  If your trip is photography-focused, you will need to be mentally prepared to be on site at times that may be inconvenient to others you travel with.  When I have made my fall foliage trips, the majority of them have either been alone, or with other, equally serious, photographers.

Santa Fe Ski Basin
Santa Fe, NM
Copyright 2008 Andy Richards

Don’t forget the “other” gear you may need.  Most fall foliage locations have the potential for very warm weather, rain, and even freezing temperatures (especially at sunrise).  Hat, gloves, sunscreen, and adaptable clothing is important.

Fall Color Reflection
Copyright 2012 Andy Richards

Most important of all, though is to have fun and enjoy the process as much as the result!  Best to all of out out there and good shooting!

Burton Hill Road
Barton, Vermont
Copyright 2010 Andy Richards

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“Photographing Vermont’s Fall Foliage” 2nd Edition is on the Way!

Second Edition!

It is hard for me to believe that is has been 5 years, since I first published this e-book!  If you are familiar with the First Edition, you will note the addition of Carol Smith as co-author.

In 2015, I published my second e-book on photographing Michigan’s UP. Trying to cover the whole UP alone was a daunting task, and I asked my good friend, Kerry Liebowitz to co-write it with me. I thought the additional coverage Kerry could offer, as well as commentary on the places we were both familiar with, would make it a better, stronger book.

Building on that experience, I asked Carol if she would co-author the 2nd Edition with me. I “met” Carol on the Scenes of Vermont Fall Foliage Board, while researching my trips to Vermont, and relied heavily on her knowledge and assistance when writing the first edition.  I encourage readers here to view her imagery on her own website.  We have regularly compared notes, and since “meeting” on the internet photography boards, have shot a number of times, in-person, together in Vermont.  Carol’s knowledge of the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont is near-encyclopedic.  And she is rapidly gaining similar knowledge of the rest of the state.  It became a matter of natural progression that she should join me as co-author for this new Edition.

We are very pleased to bring you many new locations, while retaining the bulk of the information from the First Edition.  In some cases, we have been able to report changes to scenes.

The manuscript has been submitted to our publisher and we expect it to be pushed out to the major e-book sellers (iBooks, Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Kobo and others) very soon.  The effort here involved re-formatting the original to add new touches, and re-working all of the images, due to the publisher’s ability to work with higher resolution.  It is significantly longer than the First Edition and has been labor-intensive over the summer.  While this is a late announcement for fall foliage shooters, the advantage of being able to download the book “instantly” will hopefully make it possible for shooters planning a trip to Vermont, to make use of it yet this year.  Unfortunately, while the 2nd Edition is in the process of conversion and distribution, we were informed that the major ebook providers require us to take the First Edition out of distribution, so if you go looking for it, you probably will not find itStay tuned for the more in-depth 2nd Edition!  I will announce as soon as I receive confirmation of availability!

The Sun Rises; Reprise

Bay Bridge Sunrise San Francisco, CA Copyright Andy Richards 2014

Bay Bridge Sunrise
San Francisco, CA
Copyright Andy Richards 2014

It seemed like 16 images were too many for a single blog post (really, 8 is probably too many, and my blogs tend to be longer than a blog should be 🙂 ).  So I split my sunrise images into 2 installments.

Bean Pond Barton, VT Copyright Andy Richards 2010

Bean Pond
Barton, VT
Copyright Andy Richards 2010

In 2010, I again visited Vermont for a fall color photography excursion.  My good friend, fellow photographer, fellow blogger, and co-author of the 2nd Edition of Photographing Vermont’s Fall Foliage, Carol, acted as my host and guide for the first couple days.  One magical place she took me too was Bean Pond, a small, unremarkable roadside pond near here home in Barton in the “Northeast Kingdom” of Vermont.  Unremarkable, that is, unless you are a photographer looking for fall foliage venues.  Since my first trip there, I have been back to the pond several times (and I am certain Carol has been there almost daily when she is in Vermont in season).  Our morning broke very cold, with frost on the ground, after a prolonged spell of heavy rain.  We knew the conditions were ripe for fog and steam rising off the pond and she had us there by twilight.  The resulting images (only one here) made the cold, early morning well worth it.

Bay Bridge San Francisco, CA Copyright Andy Richards 2011

Bay Bridge
San Francisco, CA
Copyright Andy Richards 2011

In 2011, we visited San Francisco, to visit our daughter.  She lives in downtown, which put me in the middle of one of the best photography venues I have ever visited.  Once again, the 3 hour time change worked in favor of early rising, and a 15 minute walk brought me to the Embarcadero, at the eastern boundary of the city, and one of San Francisco’s seaports with a closeup view of one of the two major bridges leading into San Francisco, the San Francisco Bay Bridge.  There are San Francisco Bay shooting opportunities all along the Embarcadero.  We returned again in 2014, and I couldn’t resist a couple more early morning walking trips to the Embarcadero.

Mocassin Lake Munising, MI Copyright Andy Richards 2010

Mocassin Lake
Hiawatha NF
Munising, MI
Copyright Andy Richards 2010

I have been traveling to the Michigan Upper Peninsula (U.P.) for many years for fall color photography.  As many readers here know, I think highly enough of the photographic potential that I have co-written an eBook on Photographing the Michigan U.P., with my good friend and fellow photographer and blogger, Kerry Leibowitz.  I have photographed Mocassin Lake many times and never cease to find it photogenic.  My writings on the U.P. and some of my imagery captured the attention of a professional photographer and teacher in Pennsylvania, James Moore.  Inn 2012, he decided to host one of his workshops in the U.P.  He asked me to be his guide.  These images were all made during the 2012 trip.  I appreciate his inspiration and I think that week was the most rewarding of all of my trips to the U.P.  I was there from the beginning to the peak of color, perhaps the only time in my shooting career.

Pete's Lake Hiawatha NF, Munising, MI Copyright Andy Richards 2012

Pete’s Lake
Hiawatha NF, Munising, MI
Copyright Andy Richards 2012

Pete's Lake Hiawatha NF, Munising, MI Copyright Andy Richards 2012

Pete’s Lake
Hiawatha NF, Munising, MI
Copyright Andy Richards 2012

In 2013 we went on two more cruises.  In January, we joined a group affiliated with the O’Brien Estate Winery in Napa, Ca, on a Caribbean Cruise.  We didn’t know a soul when we boarded.  We were fortunate to have some very friendly table mates and we ended up not only spending most of our time on board with them and another couple, but we have made lifelong friends.  We have traveled to Napa together, and they have recently visited us in our Florida home.  It was a great cruise.  As we arrived home in the early morning hours, I was able to capture this sunrise image of the Miami Skyline.

Miami, FL Copyright Andy Richards 2013

Miami, FL
Copyright Andy Richards 2013

Later, in September, we took what was my first trip out of the U.S. (Canada doesn’t count 🙂 ); a Mediterranean Cruise.  We started with a few days in Venice.  My only sunrise shot during that trip was the famous gondolas in St. Mark’s Square, which took some doing.  We were staying on the mainland, so I had to take the early train to Venice and then find my way through the maze to the square before the sunrise.  I had practiced a couple times.

Gondolas San Marco Piazza Venice, Italy Copyright Andy Richards 2013

Gondolas
San Marco Piazza
Venice, Italy
Copyright Andy Richards 2013

I grew up in the Northern Michigan town of Traverse City.  It is a resort town, and by all reports, beautiful in all seasons.  The city sits at the base of a peninsula of land (Old Mission Peninsula) which creates two deep bays (East Bay and West Bay) into Lake Michigan.  It has unique, sandy coastline and a climate similar to that of Northern California (except that winters up there are brutal and snowy).  I moved away from there shortly after I graduated from High School in 1975.  But I still have family there, and only live about 2 3/4 hours away.  It occurred to me at some point that I had spent little time photographing up there, and so, in 2014, with no major fall foliage outings planned, took a long-weekend trip up there.  I was on the high point of the peninsula, where it is possible to see both bays, at sunrise.  This sunrise image faces (perhaps obviously) East Bay.

Center Road Old Mission Peninsula Traverse City, MI Copyright Andy Richards 2014

Center Road
Old Mission Peninsula
Traverse City, MI
Copyright Andy Richards 2014

 

O.k., I think I am safe here: “The Sun Also Rises”

Otter Beach Sunrise Acadia NP, Bar Harbor, ME Copyright Andy Richards 2009

Otter Beach Sunrise
Acadia NP, Bar Harbor, ME
Copyright Andy Richards 2009

When I — “tongue in cheek” — noted that I didn’t want to offend Hemingway and be guilty of the very thing I occasionally rant against, copyright infringement, an astute friend pointed out that it wasn’t Hemingway’s at all, but actually comes from the bible.  I am reasonably certain we are beyond the copyright expiration date for the particular author.  So there you go.  🙂

Sunrises reveal themselves in a number of varied conditions

Perhaps more meaningfully, my left turn into the topic of “sunrise” vs “sunset,” caused me to wonder just how many times I had ventured into the early morning, pre-dawn darkness, to try to capture the sunrise.  So I went back through my archives.  I was surprised (though I should not have been) to find that my sunrise images were far fewer than my sunset images.  I found about sixteen of them, most of which I had never given any serious post-processing.  I will use the next two posts to showcase some of them.  I will not say they are in every instance, my best work (in fact a couple were taken with lower-quality digital cameras in low light conditions — in a time when sensors were simply not as good as they are today).  The St. Thomas shot was made as the sun broke the horizon in the pre-dawn light, with a Canon G12 (which had a smaller and less capable sensor than my Sony RX100iv).  My Sony body is half its physical size.

St. Thomas, USVI Copyright Andy Richards 2012

St. Thomas, USVI
Copyright Andy Richards 2012

I believe the images here illustrate some of what I said in the prior post.  Sunrises reveal themselves in a number of varied conditions.  Sunsets can often be colorful.  Sunrises are generally more subtle, but as the Otter Beach shot shows, there are occasionally glorious exceptions.  Cooler temperatures create fog and mist.  Cold temperatures create a cool look to the image colors.

Saginaw County Sunrise Copyright Andy Richards 2006

Saginaw County Sunrise
Copyright Andy Richards 2006

The earliest recorded attempt I made at sunrise shooting was on a freezing cold morning in February, not far from my home in Saginaw, Michigan.  Saginaw is part of the so-called, I-75 industrial corridor, formerly known for its General Motors auto manufacturing plants.  But it may not be a well-known that it is also one of the largest agricultural areas in the mid-west.  As soon as you leave the city in almost any direction, there are farms and farmland.  This image was taken with my Nikon 35mm SLR camera and color transparency film.  Slow ISO speeds of such film dictated the use of a sturdy tripod and cable release.  The image here was scanned with an Epson scanner and is not the quality equivalent of the drum scanners that were used back then to digitize media in high resolution.  Even so, I am impressed with what modern “home-brew” digital technology can accomplish.

Horseshoe Lake Huron NF, Glennie, MI Copyright Andy Richards 2008

Horseshoe Lake
Huron NF, Glennie, MI
Copyright Andy Richards 2008

When my son was younger (me too 🙂 ), we used to do an annual late summer camping trip.  One of our favorite spots was a small National Forest Campground called Horseshoe Lake, in Lower Michigan.  One of my early “successful” attempts at sunrise photography was, perhaps, unplanned.  I have never been a fan of camping and especially, of sleeping on the cold, damp, lumpy ground.  So it was not surprising that I woke early in the pre-dawn.  I restarted our campfire and boiled a pot of water for coffee.  My son (like any pre-teenager) was sound asleep and apparently unfazed by the lumpy ground.  So I carried camera and tripod a few hundred feet down to the water’s edge and began looking for compositions.  I made a few images that morning, but the resulting shot was a bit of a surprise.  The image was shot on Fuji Velvia color transparency film.  A characteristic of this film with certain light conditions is to render blue.  While this was not my “vision” while making the image, I liked it well enough to keep it.  And it has been sold a number of times.  Who knew?

Otter Cliff Otter Beach, Acadia NP Bar Harbor, ME Copyright Andy Richards 2009

Otter Cliff
Otter Beach, Acadia NP
Bar Harbor, ME
Copyright Andy Richards 2009

In 2009, my best friend, Rich, and our spouses made a week-long trip to Bar Harbor, Maine, and Acadia National Park.   We always have fun when the 4 of us travel.  But Rich and I are pretty unrelenting on our commitment to be out early.  This trip was no exception, and we picked our way down a little known path (we had found during prior daylight) to a rocky portion of Otter Beach, where both the image above, and the opening image were taken, several mornings, waiting for the elusive sunrise I think it was worth the wait when this one finally came.

Sunrise on the Gastineau Channel; Inside Passage Juneau, AK Copyright Andy Richards 2010

Sunrise on the Gastineau Channel; Inside Passage
Juneau, AK
Copyright Andy Richards 2010

In 2010, we to our first cruise.  I was lukewarm about the whole cruise idea.  In my mind, cruises were about partying shipboard, buffets, and sun and fun in the Caribbean (which, it turns out, isn’t such a bad gig after all).  My wife wanted to do a cruise, so I agreed–as long as I got to pick it.  And I chose the Alaska Inside Passage cruise.  It turned out to be a great trip and we learned that cruising is a pretty comfortable way to see new places.

Inside Passage, AK Copyright Andy Richards 2010

Inside Passage, AK
Copyright Andy Richards 2010

Another plus to going west is the time change.  Already a relatively early riser, the 3 and eventually 4 hour time difference had my wide-eyed before first light nearly every morning, as we cruised the inside passage.  The sun was pure gold the morning we approached the port of Juneau.  A day later, approaching Skagway, the rising sun lit the sky with multiple colors.

Whittier, AK Copyright Andy Richards 2010

Whittier, AK
Copyright Andy Richards 2010

On the final morning of our cruise, I walked the rear deck of our ship, the Diamond Princess, and watched a dramatic sunrise under cloudy skies.  I was a convert to cruising, and we would cruise 3 more times between 2010 and 2013.

Sunrise in the Caribbean Royal Princess Cruise Ship Copyright 2013 Andy Richards

Sunrise in the Caribbean
Royal Princess Cruise Ship
Copyright 2013 Andy Richards

Old Boats

One of the really fascinating finds of my trip to Newport was the prevalence of very old boats.  There is an entire industry about finding and restoring very old wooden boats, often from a wrecked status to like-new condition.  There were amazing examples all over Newport when we were there.  Some of it was the draw of the international show.  But much of it is also specific to Newport.

Multi-Million $ "Boats" Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Multi-Million $ “Boats”
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

We were able to go aboard the completely refurbished wooden cruiser closest to the dock.  It is luxurious.  Cost of these rebuilds, I am told, range in the $10 – 15 million arena.

Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

We were also intrigued by the “old school” workmanship of the newest of America’s “Tall Ships,” which acts as a school and maritime school for young people.

Old Boat Hardware Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Old Boat Hardware
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

The the best of all, was our walk-through of the International Yacht Restoration School (IYRS) .  Here they have small classes of 12 -14 students who go through 2 years of wooden boat building training and education.  It is mainly “hands-on.”  One of the things the teams do is completely restore certain model, old wooden boats that were popular enough years back that they are fairly plentiful.  AS you can see, they are typically in very poor – even shipwrecked condition.  But they find them and bring them back to the school where they restore and then sell them.

Wooden Boats Awaiting Restoration Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Wooden Boats Awaiting Restoration
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

They also do single model restorations.  These are typically paid for by benevolent owners.  The boats shown here are popular small models.

Wooden Boat Being Restored Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Wooden Boat Being Restored
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Completed Restoration Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Completed Restoration
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

"Deepwater" Another popular restoration Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

“Deepwater”
Another popular restoration
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

In addition to the ongoing school efforts, IYRS is currently involved in the long-term restoration of a one-of-a-kind recreational sailing yacht, the Coronet, a 131 foot, 1885 Schooner.  The yacht was involved in one of the first ever transatlantic races, and was sailed around the globe by its original owner.  It was owned by several different owners prior to being acquired by IYRS in 1995.  IYRS later conveyed title to a group of investors, who are paying to have it restored.  Begun in 2010, restorations are ongoing.  The yacht has been added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Coronet IYRS, Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Coronet
IYRS, Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Coronet IYRS, Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Coronet
IYRS, Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Coronet IYRS, Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Coronet
IYRS, Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Coronet IYRS, Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Coronet
IYRS, Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Hardware; Coronet IYRS, Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Hardware; Coronet
IYRS, Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Everything will be restored or rebuild as close to original spec and materials as possible.  It was a fascinating thing to behold;  And to imagine a private yacht as large and as luxurious as this back in 1885.

Newport and Boats; Is There Anything Else?

View of Newport from Goat Island Copyright Andy Richards 2016

View of Newport from Goat Island
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

If your only information about Newport and Rhode Island came from my blog, at this point you might think it is just one big boat harbor.  But there is more.  One of the things I have learned about travel photography (perhaps all facets of photography) is that there are subjects that lend themselves to shooting with the time, equipment and access that many of us have, and there are simply subjects that do not.  And time, often also dictates shooting priorities.

Cliff Walk Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Cliff Walk
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Newport is home to many cultural additions other than its estimable marine industry.  There is probably no more famous “summer cottages,” than the “Cliff Mansions.”  And the Cliff Walk along the shore the houses those mansions is worth the shoe leather.  But it is really not a photographer’s prime destination.  It may lend itself to a few shots for travel purposes, but not for general-purpose landscape photography.  Perhaps given a little more time, particularly during sunrise and sunset hours, I may have had a different take-away.  As it is, I made on image that I thought had some potential, using the sweep of a decorative wall as a prop.

Cliff Walk Mansion Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Cliff Walk Mansion
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

The mansions are, in my view, hampered by a lack of access.  What I mean by that is I could no go where I wanted to to shoot them. Many of them are publicly owned, but they are also fenced.  From the cliff walk, it is difficult to get a perspective for making a good photograph.  It would require, at the very least, access to the grounds.  And perhaps it would also require some more specialized equipment such as ladders and wider lenses.  And like so many public places, even where access is possible, it is usually not so during the “golden light” hours.  Given proper time, research and contacts, I have no doubt some great images could be made of these mansions.  We were also disappointed to find that nearly everyone had ongoing maintenance, with scaffolding covering them.  Lets hope that maintenance yields some great results for those who come later :-).

Cliff Walk Mansion Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Cliff Walk Mansion
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

The entire area, of course, is one big series of beaches and points and islands.  We drove a number of the beach roads.  From one very high view, I was able to capture a very interesting reef formation covered with colorful green marine growth.

Rock Reef Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Rock Reef
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

I have mentioned Goat Island, in the context of the lighthouse, actually known as The Newport Harbor Light.  Early Newport settlers used the island as a goat pasture.  The island also housed a fort which changed from Spanish to colonial, to British and back to U.S. military holdings over its history, finally housing a torpedo factory for the U.S. Navy.  In the 1960s,he island was sold to private developers and the Newport Hyatt Regency stands there today along with some restaurants.  The light is still active, and is part of a very nice walk around the island and the hotel complex with great views of the bay and back toward Newport Harbor.

Goat Island Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Goat Island
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Goat Island Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Goat Island
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Goat Island Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Goat Island
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

 

 

More Rhode Island; It Really IS About the Boats

Gazebo, Brenton Cove Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Gazebo, Brenton Cove
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

We didn’t ever really find a great sunrise shooting location.  At the south end of town there is a nice harbor area called Brenton Cove.  Brenton Cove houses a private yacht club, the Newport Sailing School, and Historic Fort Adams..  There is a nice path that borders the water there and runners, bikers and walkers are a pretty common sight.  While we were not going to capture the sun coming up under the bridge here, we did know we were going to get some nice light, on some nice “marine” subjects, including boats, the bridge, and things related.

Brenton Cove Newport, RI Andy Richards 2016

Brenton Cove
Newport, RI
Andy Richards 2016

The little jetty that goes out from the street into the harbor holds a public dinghy dock.  It made a nice lead in for a panorama I made in the bright early morning sun.

Brenton Cove Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Brenton Cove
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

There is also The Newport Public Sailing Center.  As we talked to local residents, it is apparently a pretty common thing for young people to learn to sail in Newport.  Go figure. 🙂

Newport Public Sailing Center Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Newport Public Sailing Center
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016

I had visions of a sunrise shot of the bridge from this vantage point, off the grounds of Fort Adams, but it wasn’t to be.

Jamestown Bridge from Ft. Adams Newport, RI Copyright Andy Richards 2016

Jamestown Bridge from Ft. Adams
Newport, RI
Copyright Andy Richards 2016