Cold as Ice

Ice On Tree Branches
[Copyright Andy Richards 2006]
This is an image I took after a freezing rain during winter, 2006. I don’t remember where I was, but I know it was in Michigan in March. Yes, that is definitely still winter in Michigan 🙂 .

I have always been intrigued by the look of rain that has frozen and stuck to branches, and the light being reflected from it and through it.

Only recently, did I feel that I had the software and skills to process the image the way I saw it in my “minds-eye.” You may still think I don’t have those skills :-).

This image has never been posted anywhere before. I hope you like it.

Stay Safe

Into the Night

San Francisco Skyline
I shot this from Alcatraz Island on a mini tripod on a very windy night. Though not the razor sharp image I was hoping for, I was happy to be able to get it as sharp as I did
[Copyright Andy Richards 2011]

For many of us, night signals the end of our primary activities, work, school, and even “play.” We generally come home, prepare and eat dinner, wind down, and go to sleep.

When night comes, we often think it is time to pack up our gear, and go home

Photographers often take the same approach. Much attention (rightfully) is focused on the “golden” hours in the early morning and again in the early evening. Events are often either during the day, or in well-lit settings. And, after all, the word photography roughly means: “painting with light.” So when darkness comes, we often think it is time to pack up our gear, and go home.

Grand Canal; Venice, Italy
I shot this handheld, leaning on a bridge, at 1/30 second. Images like this really demand a tripod for maximum sharpness. Unfortunately, I did not have a tripod, but I did my best without by bracing on the bridge
[Copyright Andy Richards 2013]

But we really shouldn’t. Because if we do, we are missing out on a significant venue for photography. It really pays to take your camera out and explore the night. My “Into The Night” Gallery on my photo website contains my “low light” imagery.

Tokyo Tower
This was taken from inside our completely darkened room at the Park Hotel. It is difficult to do night images through glass windows, but we could not find an outdoor vantage point to get this perspective
[Copyright Andy Richards 2015]

The subject matter will most likely be different. Except in unique and limited circumstances, traditional landscape and nature photography will not work well at night. It is difficult enough to photograph wildlife in the low light conditions when they are active. It would be mostly impossible to do much with them after dark. Most “grand landscape” scenes and the elements used to frame a good photograph” will go dark to black and detail – less.

Capitol; Washington Monument and Lincoln Memorial from across the reflecting pool
This was my first ever foray into nightime shooting, This image was made with Kodachrome 25 slide film long before digital was available to most of us
[Copyright Andy Richards 1980]

A notable exception to my “landscape” exclusion is shooting the night skies. That is an area I have not yet made the time and effort to pursue. I have two very talented friends who have spent a lot of time shooting the night sky – mainly the milky way. I encourage you to visit the of Al Utzig’s “After Dark” Portfolio, and Margy Meath’s “Night Sky” Gallery, to see their excellent night sky photography.

Iwo Jima War Memorial; Rossyln, Washington, D.C.
Strong graphic elements and artificial lighting expose the details and textures in this image
[Copyright Andy Richards 2011]
Copyright

My own night shooting has mostly been in and around cities, or areas with substantial architectural details. There need to be some strong graphic elements in most cases.

Bay Bridge; San Francisco, CA
[Copyright Andy Richards 2014]

Artificial light also makes up an important part of night shooting. There are opportunities, and there are challenges. One opportunity is to show movement creatively. Moving vehicles, for example, show streaks of light (usually the red-colored tail lights give the best result). There are often many different colored lights, which present great opportunities for photographs. The shot of Tokyo Tower, with its colorful night time lighting is a great example, I think.

Port of Barcelona
Sometimes high vantage points help with night images. This was taken from the top deck of our cruise ship
[Copyright Andy Richards 2020]

Nightime lighting can also create great reflection opportunities. The Port of Barcelona and the Bay Bridge images are good examples of reflected light and in the case of the port, color.

Cruise Ships
The noise in this image, made with an early version Canon Powershot, was so bad, that I did the only thing I could think of: I made it “worse,” by applying one of Photoshops many so-called, “artistic” filters
[Copyright Andy Richards 2012]

There are “challenges.” The most obvious is the lack of light; lilght being the very thing that creates a photographic image, either by reflecting off a photosensor, or if you are “old school,” off of an unexposed silvery halide film emulsion. Back in 1980 when I shot the monuments my ISO rating was 25! If you wanted something “faster” (meaning less light needed to make the exposure), you were basically relegated to B&W. And 400 was blazing fast back then (sometimes you could push it to 800, but with a sacrifice in quality). When digital came along, it offered faster ISO speeds (and the ability to vary the ISO from shot to shot). But it took many years from the time the first digital cameras hit the market until we had any real gain in that area. The primary problem with higher ISO sensors was something called “noise.” Borrowed from the radio/electronics industry, the term “noise” refers to random electronic signals generated in the camera’s electronics. There are numerous culprits, including sensor size and density and heat. But day after day, the technical design and manufacturing just gets better.

Port of Naples
This shot was made at 6400 ISO and though there was some noise in the water in the foreground and the black hull of the boat, most of it was made more palatable with NIK’s Dfine noise reduction software.
[Copyright Andy Richards 2013]

Current sensors give us the ability to go more than 200 times higher ISO than my Kodachrome 25. The Grand Canal image, for example, was made at 6400 ISO. This allowed for an f6.3 aperture at 1/30 of a second. There is evidence of noise in that image, but it is certainly not unpleasant. and at slower ISO, or larger sensors visible noise has been severely reduced, if not eliminated. The Tokyo Tower shot was a 4 second exposure with no noticeable noise.

Hotel Monteleone, New Orleans, LA
This image, made with my smaller sensor Sony RX100, at ISO 3200 and 1/80 sec, is uniformly noisy, but not unpleasant
[Copyright Andy Richards 2018]

Of course, the other way to deal with lack of light would be to affix your camera to something stationary – most often a sturdy tripod – and make longer exposures. Remember, the Grand Canal image was made handheld (I didn’t have a tripod with me, but I made the best use of the camera I had with me – the important point being I had the camera with me). Obviously the ability to shoot high ISO speeds is giving us more flexibility and versatility than in years past.

Frontier Street; Las Vegas, NV
City streets, colors and neon make great night time shooting subjects
[Copyright Andy Richards 2016]

And, longer exposures bring with them another set of challenges. Historically, there has been a direct corellation between length of exposure and noise. Although similar to grain in film, it is really a technically very different phenomena and a new concept to work with for photographers. Noise can show up looking like grain. It can also show up as “color” noise which gives the image a kind of blotchy, red/green/blue look. In the past we have had to work with it by watching both ISO and exposure length, and often depending on post-processing “denoise” software. There is still occasion to use such software, but it is much less often necessary. And did I say the sensor technology has gotten better? Again, current sensors all very high ISO performance, and create less heat, rendering relatively noise-free low light images. There is still not much doubt, though, that my full frame sensor gives “cleaner” results than my Sony RX100.

Split Rock Lighthouse; Two Harbors, MN
Fireworks always make great night image shooting. Often shot from or over water venues, there are almost always reflection opportunities. I was fortunate to be at this lighthouse on one of the few nights it is lit during the year – and the fireworks were just an added bonus
[Copyright Andy Richards 2010]

Even before noise was an issue, there were circumstances that made longer exposures problematic. The biggest ones? Wind and subject movement. Neither, of course, is solely a night issue. But it makes things you may not have thought about now an issue. In 2016, I was in Rhode Island and took some night shots of a lighted bridge with boats in the foreground. It was windy and I just couldn’t get an image I liked, of the lights strung along the structural cables. The wind made it impossible to shoot at a shutter speed that would capture them as sharp.

Newport Bridge; Brenton Cove; Newport, RI
This photograph was made after sunseet at the remaining light was nearly gone. The ability of modern cameras/sensors to capture light is astounding. To our eyes, that wonderful pink glow in the sky was barely visible. And there was enough wind that it was difficult to get the lights on the bridge sharp
[Copyright Andy Richards 2016]

Another challenge to this kind of shooting environment is, ironically, the light. As I noted in one of the post-processing blogs recently, color – to photographers and viewers – is largely a matter of perception. Having said that, it is also the case that there are limits to our variation in perception. For most of us, there will come a time where color just won’t seem “true” anymore. One of the most difficult areas to control has historically been when shooting with artificial light. We are geared to sunny daylight in our judgement of color. These days, LED lighting technology has made it possible to mimic daylight. Just a short few years ago, that wasn’t the case. Regular incandescant light tended to give color a yellow (“warm”) cast. Those ubiquitous flourescent tubes (think offices, kitchens, garages and basements) gave off an ugly greenish cast. Outdoor (mercury vapor) lighting was yellow or orange. Of course, many of these light sources still abound – especially outdoors at night. And they definitely make colors – interesting. 🙂 The Saginaw Waterworks image has such a mix of light sources and colors that it was virtually impossible to recreate what my own eyes “saw” (our eyes and brain work together to “color correct” in these situation when you are on site. But viewing a photograph shows us what was really captured and/or presented. Sometimes, I think these color inconsistencies make for good photography. Nobody would say the “night sky” in the waterworks picture looks “natural.” And the “reds” and “greens” aren’t exactly red or green. But it certainly makes for a colorful holiday image.

Saginaw Water Treatment Facility; Saginaw, MI
There may be no better subject for colors and lights than holiday images. I always try to get out at night during the Christmas Season. The shear number of lights, as well as the already ample year-round building lighting almost makes the sky look like daylight here. But is was assuredly after dark
[Copyright Andy Richards 2009]

Before the digital “age,” films were “color-balanced” to a certain standard. Most were “daylight” balanced. Some specialty films (Kodak had a “tungsten” slide film, for example) were purposely balanced to produce “truer” color under artificial light. Digital gives us the ability to adjust the color balance for each image. To me that is a spectacular advantage to digital processing. For those who only shoot jpegs, color balance needs to be set on the camera, and adjusted for the condition. Most cameras refer to this a the “white balance” setting. In most cases, if you shoot raw, you can color balance in post-processing, which is what I personally prefer. Unless I am shooting jpegs for some reason, I don’t worry about the white balance setting.

Pete’s Lake; Hiawatha NF; Michigan U.P.
We arrived year well before dawn in darkness lit only by the moonlight; to shoot the sunset. But this was the most memorable image of the morning for me
[Copyright Andy Richards]

One other things probably deserves mention here. I am writing about “night shooting.” Perhaps a definition of night is needed? I don’t know. For me, night is any time after sundown and before sunrise. I have done an awful lot of shooting during the beginning and end of the day period known as twilight. What I have learned is that sometimes the “show” really isn’t the sunrise or sunset at all. Sometimes the real image is before things start up and after the sun has passed well below the horizon. The Newport Bridge, Bay Bridge, Goat Island Light and Pete’s Lake images are examples. The Pete’s Lake image also demonstrates one of those exceptions to my “traditional landscape” shooting comment earlier.

Goat Island Light; Newport, R.I.
I used digital processing to “bring the light up” on the adirondack chairs here. You could imagine that it is actually the moon lighting them, but there was an artifical source of light doing that
[Copyright Andy Richards 2016]

Cinque Terre

[Clicking on an image opens it in a new tab with a higher quality image and view. I encourage you to do that]

Manarola
Cinque Terre, Italy
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
All Rights Reserved

Cinque Terre. It translates roughly, to “Five Lands.” This area of the Ligurian Sea and part of the Italian Riviera is perhaps the most romantic in terms of its pull and charms. The pictures of the mountain/seaside villages are commonly found in travel brochures and literature. There are 5 small, villages built into the rugged coastline of the Mediterranean. They are connected by a railroad and by a hiking trail. There is also a highway way up above the villages. The best way to travel between them – for most of us, appears to be by railway. A day pass is relatively inexpensive and the stops are between 10 and 20 minutes apart. The stations are all right in the middle of the villages, making access easy. Cars are generally not allowed below the parking areas above each village.

Manarola
Cinque Terre, Italy
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
All Rights Reserved

Beginning on the northern part of Cinque Terre, the five villages are:  Monterosso al Mare, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore. Cinque Terre is a National Park and a UNESCO Heritage site. It gets a lot of travel, yet even with masses of people, there are vantage point which allow for some spectacular photography. The pastel colored buildings built into the mountain coastline create wonderful opportunities for photography in many different light conditions, including nighttime reflections, if you are there for the right conditions.

Manarola
Cinque Terre, Italy
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
All Rights Reserved

Unfortunately, the weather conditions during our trip here were in some ways the worst of the week. The skies were mainly cloudy, with showery and rainy conditions prevailing. The wind was fairly brisk much of the time. And as in so many other instances, we were here on a cruise with a planned one-day stop. So going in, I knew my oppurtunity was going to be daytime shots. As the following image shows, access to wonderful panoramic landscape shots are easily accessed, via a fenced walkway that goes out along the water, looking back at the village.

Manarola
Cinque Terre, Italy
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
All Rights Reserved

 

Manarola
Cinque Terre, Italy
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
All Rights Reserved

My research suggested that the most photogenic of the 5 villages were Manarola and Riomaggiore. Manarola is clearly the most photographed, and perhaps the most accessible. We were traveling that day with 2 other couples, and given the timing and the questionable weather, we decided to put all our effort into Manarola. We learned the railway system as we went. We learned that the best plan was to take a taxi to the railroad station and in the future, I will obtain the all-day pass. I would also like to plan a trip to stay over one or two nights. It would be possible to stay in La Spezia, but I would want to have a good idea of the railroad schedule, so not to miss the last train. Or plan to stay in one or more of the villages.

Manarola
Cinque Terre, Italy
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
All Rights Reserved

If you are a hiker, I think it would be a wonderful trip to start at one end and hike between the villages. It would probably be possible to do it in about 3 days (maybe even less), but it would also depend on how much time you would want to take in each village. I had originally planned to do both Manarola and Riomaggiore, but circumstances made it so that did not happen. Given better weather and a better understanding of the geography, I would definitely strike out on my own (or with other photographers) and plan stops (perhaps multiple) in both of these villages.

Manarola
Cinque Terre, Italy
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
All Rights Reserved

As you can see, like almost any location I visit, in addition to the iconic shots, there are opportunities for close compostitions, as well as finding your own unique shots.

Manarola
Cinque Terre, Italy
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
All Rights Reserved

On occasion, I find one of my shots that I think would do nicely as a painting, or at least a canvas presentation. I think the Manarola shot fits that “bill.”

Perhaps fittingly, this is the penultimate Blog Entry for 2019, and ends the series of travel posts for 2019, with a lot of new places and travel. I expect 2020 will add even more new travel. In the meantime:

Merry Christmas !!

Bruges

Bruges, Belgium

We ancitipated Bruges, which our research touted to be “The beer capital of the world.” We had a 1/2 day tour scheduled at the beginning, which in addition to some historic sites and buildings, was to also include some chocolate and beer tasting. Belgium is know for its chocolate, its waffles, and its beer. Unfortunately, we recieved a call from our guide who was driving from Brussels, as we waited out by the cruise terminal. He was tied up in traffic from a major accident and it didn’t look good that he would be arriving any time soon. We ultimately cancelled and took a taxi into the city. Even though it doesn’t seem far on the map, it was a good 1/2 hour drive, and during that time our driver – whose English was excellent (though his native language is Dutch), gave us some historical context.

Port of ZeeBrugge
Burges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Bruges, was perhaps one of the earliest Belgian cities, rising in medieval times and becoming a major trade center at the Renaissance emerged. It was strategically located near the sea (our port of call was Zeebrugge, which means “Bruges by the Sea”).

The Markt
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

There is a continuous canal from the port in to the center of the city. Its most prominent feature is the Markt, a large oval plaza, surrounded by colorful and impressive architecture; today mostly retail establishments catering largely to tourists. Our cab driver dropped us off on a quiet street directly behind the Markt and we made arrangement for him to pick us up and return us to the cruise port later that afternoon. As we walked into the open plaza, it became immediately obvious that this was a photogenic scene. Lining the plaza on one side are some very colorful buildings with Dutch Colonial architecture, belying strong Dutch influence. There are some pretty impressive historic buildings, including a belfry that dates back to 1240, once the center of the town on the other perimeters.

The Markt
Brussels, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

The Belfry is about 272 feet high and it towers over the surrounding buildings.

The Belfry of Bruges
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
The Belfry of Bruges
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Bruges City Hall also faces the Markt and is an impressive building.

Bruges City Hall
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

WWe arrived between 9:30 and 10:00 a.m., to a city that – surprisingly – had not seemed to have awoken yet. We walked around some of the surrounding streets where there were no vehicles, few people, and shops that had yet to open.

Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

 

Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

 

Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Bruges is also a city with numerous canals, and has been referred to as the Venice of the North. Having spent a fair amount of time in Venice, I can say that while the canals in Bruges (and Amsterdam) are impressive and lie in beautiful surroundings, they are very different from the canals of Venice. Notably, there are automobiles everywhere. Having said that, I will be among the first to agree that Bruges’ canals are photogenic.

Rozenhoedkaai Canal
Bruge, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

 

Canal
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

 

Canal
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

 

Canal
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Indeed, canal tours are among the most popular thing to do in Bruges, and certainly afford a great way to see the city.

Canal Tour Boad
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

In addition to tasting some of the local brew and chocolate, we did walk around the old city and saw a few other nice sights as we walked.

Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019

Ultimately, we found some beer, we found some chocolate, and we ended up a nice, rather relaxing day in Bruges at Cuvee Wine Bar, where we had a couple nice wines, and some cheeses and meats, before heading back to the cruise port. Back at the cruise port, as we sat on the back bar enjoying the late sun, a drink and the sail-away, I wasn’t sure whether to feel safe, or threatened, given that the ship moored directly behind us was most certainly not a pleasure cruiser. It appears that they make them a bit smaller than we do stateside. 🙂

Military Aircraft Carrier
Bruges, Belgium
Copyright Andy Richards 2019