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Life and the Learning Curve

Beginning with the Ephesian Philosopher, Heraclitus, it has often been famously said that “change is the only constant.”  I recently purchased yet another version of my preferred textbook on Photoshop by Martin Evening: “Adobe Photoshop CC for photographers” (formerly “Adobe Photoshop for Photographers”); now “version 2018”.  My last version was purchased only 4 years ago, and yes, there has been that much change in this program!  I had been refreshing my memory on a couple of the tool settings and realized that there are options on my screen that weren’t covered by my bookThat got me thinking about change and the learning curve.

it has been my thesis over the years that although we now have some pretty amazing digital cameras at reasonable prices, it was consumer “point & shoot” digital cameras that drove the revolution

Thomas and John Knoll first created their “Photoshop” software, to display grayscale images on computers, in 1987.  Not yet “ready for prime time” or for retail consumption, the early “Knoll Software” company’s program was first known simply as “Display.”  It was shortly changed to “Image-Pro.”  But when they finally found a buyer and it went to the commercial/retail market in 1988, having been licensed to the Adobe Software Company, it became “Photoshop,” and continues to this day, to be the benchmark everyone is trying to meet or beat.

Nikon DCS 100

While the very first useable digital camera was probably created by Kodak in 1975, the real “revolution” began in the late 1980’s and early 1990’s.  During that time period some DSLR cameras were produced but were too expensive for general consumption.  Smaller “digicams” began to appear, however, and it has been my thesis over the years that although we now have some pretty amazing digital cameras at reasonable prices, it was these consumer “point & shoot” digital cameras that drove the revolution.  The 1991 Nikon D1 was probably the first semi-affordable enthusiast/pro camera and still cost a healthy $5,000 (while weighing in at nearly 3 pounds and delivering a whopping 2.7 megapixels).  Canon and Fujifilm followed shortly.  Then the Canon 3 megapixel, D30 debuted in 2000 as the first real “prosumer” DLSR.  In 2002, they followed with a 6 megapixel D60 and Nikon matched with their own 6 megapixel D100, both coming in just under $2,000, and the “prosumer” DSLR revolution was in full swing.

Sony RX100

For the next nearly 20 years, we saw a continuous lineup of new digital cameras, beginning with “APS” sized sensors, to so-called “full-frame” 35mm-equivalent sensors, and from traditional SLR-styled bodies, to the newer mirrorless models.  Of course, there were also larger format digital bodies, but because of a mix of expense and size and limitations on ISO, they have never caught on with the masses.

Along with the evolution of digital cameras, there was a need/demand for pixel-editing software.  And while there have certainly been numerous participants in the mix, Photoshop has been the benchmark to meet or beat.  From 1990 on, there were new editions released approximately every two years.  When first released, Photoshop was written for MAC computers and only available on Apple’s platform until version 2.5, released in 1992.  Clearly this was in response to demand.  Since version 2.5, new releases have essentially been parallel for Window and Mac.  And over time, some pretty impressive new features were added every few years.  Originally having notable features like levels, curves, the clone tool, color balance, hue and saturation adjustments, in 1994, layers were added to version 3.0.

with the evolution of digital cameras, there was a need/demand for pixel-editing software

In 2003, for reasons really known only to Adobe, Photoshop dropped the version numbers in the title (with version 7.0 being the last) and became “Photoshop CS” (versions are still retained, however).  CS introduced ACR (Adobe Camera Raw decoding engine) 2x.  CS2, in 2007, added a new user interface and some additional bells and whistles.  CS3 continued the “new and improved” feature set.  In 2008, CS4 was released with lots of “refinements,” but nothing new and exciting. Though we are up to, I believe, “version 7 or 8 of ACR, there is little or no change from version number to version number.  The real changes occurred in what Adobe refers to as their “process version.”  In 2003, we were working with process version 1.  Process version 2 was rolled out in 2010.  It may have been the most dramatic change.  Process version 3 came in 2012, and we are now working with process version 4, since 2017.

My LightCentric Logo Image in the current Photoshop CC version of Camera Raw

At the same time, Adobe released Lightroom 1.0 in 2007, following with version 2.0 in 2008.  This program was aimed squarely at photographers. Photoshop is a very robust graphics editing and creating program, which was Adobe’s only in depth pixel editing offering for serious photographers (Elements and other versions of “Photoshop – Lite” type software were available, but were in my experience, woefully inadequate to the task).  In the meantime, many of us photographers found that the continuing stream of new versions often did not justify the cost of the upgrade.  We often skipped a version (or two or three).  Then, when the CS series came along, Adobe began to essentially require sequential upgrading.  Shortly after that, Adobe announced the discontinuation of the stand-alone version of Photoshop,with the roll-out of cloud-based Photoshop CC (in lieu of CS7).  Unlike the former Photoshop model, “owners” of the full program installed on their computer (well, at least owners of the right to use it 🙂 ) have now become “subscribers,” paying a monthly fee and working in “the cloud” (on the internet).  This, in all probability, has motivated some new, competing “complete photo-editing” programs, which tout the fact that they are still stand-alone.  And some of them are pretty darn good.

Screenshot from my Lightroom catalog

Lightroom has continued to develop (pun intended) as a stand-alone photographers’ alternative to Photoshop.  Apple’s now-discontinued Aperture was also a parallel Lightroom alternative for Apple owners (I am not an Apple user, but I understand that part of the decision involved Apple’s roll-out of a new program called “Photos” which will integrate with its iCloud – it appears that iPhotos and Aperture will not, including the legacy software, which should still work stand-alone).  Meanwhile, it seems that everyone is jumping on the raw editor “bandwagon.”  A quick online search reveals at least 10 (and I am sure there are more) names that have some familiarity out there.  Some of them started out as Photoshop “plugins.”  I have played around with a couple of them, including ON1, Capture 1, and Topaz Labs.  They are all up-and-coming Photoshop competitors.  There are those who say one or the other of them does some things better than Photoshop.  Sounds a bit like the “camera wars” we have all come to know.  Every “flavor” is going to have do some things better than the others, and some things not so well.  I will continue to look at these alternative (or in some cases supplemental) programs.  But for now, Photoshop still does the overall combination of things that works best for me (and at this time, I believe, the majority of others doing digital post-processing).

owners of Photoshop have now become subscribers

All of these software programs (though they have many similarities) have a new and different “learning curve.”  Photoshop is — perhaps — the most daunting of all of them, and once a person has put as much time as many of us have into learning its “ins and outs,” it is hard to shift to a different program.  As for Photoshop, I have owned many “how too” texts for Photoshop (as well as Lightroom and some of the plug-ins for Photoshop and Lightroom).  I feel like I have contributed my part to the publishing industry’s well-being 🙂 (though it looks more and more like they are going to be eclipsed by digital media).  The Martin Evening Book is over 700 pages and only attempts to cover the photographer-aspect of this very complex and very robust program.  It is a $50.00 book and that is an expensive addition to the already healthy cost of acquiring and maintaining Photoshop.  But is the only comprehensive “textbook” guide available of its kind (that is not intended to be a lukewarm endorsement – it really is a very good book).  There is a lot of material available free on the internet.  But there is no real organized source to have as a desktop companion when working with the program.  The Adobe site’s so-called “help” program is not really very good, in my opinion.  It is too general, and there is as much of a chance of not finding the item you need explained or expounded as not.  Unfortunately, most of this text are 80% repetition from past versions.  It would really be nice if the writers and publishers would offer a smaller (and cheaper) version that is kind of a “What’s New In Version x.0” (which is done now, only on a website).  But here it is.  And again, change is going to continue, and therefore apparently so is cost – if you want to move with the change. 🙂

for now, Photoshop still does the overall combination of things that works best for me

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“Going Straight”

Tilted Horizon

In my early days of blogging, I posted a series on “fundamentals” for photographers.  I don’t fancy myself a pro, or necessarily a qualified teacher.  I don’t have “credentials.”  I am self-taught, with a small amount of formal training, and many generous and talented friends.  However, I have helped some friends and family get their arms around the basics of photography, to advance beyond so-called “point and shoot.”  In fact, the genesis of my blogging here was reducing a few long-winded e-mail messages to writings that I thought could help others who have struggled as I did.

The internet and high quality smart phones have made everyone a “photographer” these days

That was a long time ago.  I have moved away from the “tips and tutorials” thing and leave that to other writers and bloggers out there, many of whom are much better qualified than I.  If you want to see my simple-minded approach to teaching, you can see my series here.  But every once in a while, my observations on-line give the urge to pontificate.  The internet and high quality smart phones have made everyone a “photographer” these days.  The technology in both IOS and Android (and others) phones today is impressive, with good lenses, good resolution, and many apps designed to assist that process.

But technical quality doesn’t guarantee a good photograph.  There is still a basic skill set required.  While technology has made good exposure (with sophisticated metering capability), and sharper images (with image-stabilization technology and ever sharper lenses) possible, there are a couple things that still require a different “built-in” but sometimes not effectively mobilized technology – the brain.  Being as guilty as the next guy, I find that in my own case, failure to take advantage of this marvelous technology (the brain) is often borne of laziness, or lack of observation of my surroundings (both during and after the image has been made, during post-processing).  While I have tried to avoid this problem, I am sure you can find an example or two of what I am going to criticize, in my “online” presence. 😦

Technical quality doesn’t guarantee a good photograph

I thought about doing a “Top 10″ things we fail to do.”  But wouldn’t be what I honestly think.  I pointedly avoid the left and right leaning political points of view here.  But there is one case in which I have to admit that I abhor leanings in both directions.  There is really one primary one that I see time and again (and when I – or someone else – catch it in my own work, I am always disconcerted).  That one thing is the left-leaning or right-leaning horizon.  I see it so often on Facebook that it has become “fingernails on a blackboard” for me.  It is the single most prominent fault (at least in my observation) of the 1000’s of posted images on the internet.  And here’s the thing:  It is fixable!  It is fixable before and after the shot (though it is always better in my mind to try to “fix” it during the shooting process).

And here’s the thing; It is fixable!

Starting Out “Straight”

One type of Hotshoe Bubble Level

Before we make the image, we have several aids available to us.  Perhaps the best (but not always feasible) one is to use a fixed camera stand (tripod) and install a bubble level on the camera hotshoe (of course, your smartphone doesn’t have a hotshoe 🙂  – more on that one later).  Before a couple of my colleagues persuaded me to use a level, I thought my own eye was pretty good at judging that.  The level proved otherwise (note, however, that not all levels are created equal.  It is worth buying one from a good source and then testing it to be sure it is accurate – I used a carpenter’s level to test mine).

Where is that thing on my smartphone?

Of course, it is not always feasible (or convenient) to shoot from a tripod.  And some of those to whom I am preaching here, don’t shoot with a dedicated camera, but use their smartphone.  In most modern cameras, the software options include an on-screen (or in-viewfinder) graphic level.  These are great tools (of course, they need to be checked and calibrated for accuracy, and there is some anecdotal commentary online that they are not always completely accurate – and there is an answer to that below).  Where is that thing on my smartphone?  To the best of my knowledge, neither the top Android (I use Samsung) and IOS phones do not have that as a built-in option.  But there are several free apps that will add that feature.  I am test-driving one called “Camera Level” that seems very much like the in-camera built-in level in my Sony cameras.  It automatically loads into your smartphone’s camera (after appropriate “registration/permission”).

One of many different variations of a built-in “electronic” level

Most software now also offers a “grid” pattern on the screen or in the viewfinder.  While I find this can be a help, your eye will still fool you.  The level won’t.  I do not think there is any good reason not to use this technology regularly.

Rehabilitation is Available

When “curating” my images after a shoot, there is little doubt that even when using these tools, I still have occasions where the image is tilting.  Fortunately, there is help for this in post-processing.  Today, virtually every post-processing software application has an automated “straighten” feature.  But even in the day when that wasn’t part of the software features, there was always a way to accomplish this.  I primarily use Photoshop and it was easy to create a straight line (using an available “grid” overlay, or a “guide”) and then rotate the image so that the horizon was straight.  And because it is possible that the level methods described above are not always accurate, it ought to always be part of your process to make sure that things are level that should be level.  Our eye will fool us from behind the lens.  But the image won’t and it will be one of the first things the astute viewer will notice.  I often quip, when seeing that ubiquitous sunset over water, “I wonder why the water doesn’t just drain out of that picture?” 🙂

There are some drawbacks to the post-processing “fix.”  It very often may require you to crop out important parts of an image, in order to straighten it (Photoshop’s impressive “content-aware” cropping can in many cases repair that problem).  It is also true that there is not always a “horizon” to reference from.  It can then become more challenging.  Straight lines that “should” be horizontal or vertical can be used, but you have to take into consideration perspective distortion created by lenses now.  But careful analysis of the photo should tell you which lines “should” be horizontal or vertical – or at least if you have to make a choice, which are aesthetically preferable.

Have a great day, be careful out there, and watch those horizons.

“I wonder why the water doesn’t just drain out of that picture?” 🙂

 

It’s Over

Daffodils
Copyright Andy Richards 2009

This will be my last post here.  I always seem to have a difficult time finding things to write about, especially during this time of year, when here in Michigan, it teases Spring, but then turns back to brown, wet and cold.  This time of year, I start to think about Spring, and perhaps the most plentiful subject; Spring flowers.  But I have “been there done that” in this blog a few times.  I haven’t shot Spring flowers for a number of years, as this opening image demonstrates (as far back as 2009).  So, since I can only go back to former years’ material, and re-post, it is time to hang it up.  But before I do, and since I have started this one, here are a few more.

Oh, and by the way, happy Easter.  This is the day that celebrates the rising of Christ …. And the re-birth, or new beginning of so many things.  And Spring and new growth could not be more fitting for the occasion.

Daffodil
Sony RX100iv
Copyright Andy Richards 2015

O.k., maybe I was wrong.  This one is the same plant, 6 years later, taken with my super-compact Sony RX100iv.

Daffodil Close Up – ColorEfex
Copyright Andy Richards 2015

This one is the same shot, but after I did the “painterly” thing in Google/NIK’s ColorEfex.  It may be the best rendition of this image.

Tulips
Copyright Andy Richards 1996

I have also shot a lot of tulips over the years in Spring.  They bloom shortly after, and often contemporaneously with the Daffodils.  One of the best parts of these flower subjects is that they are often found in our own yards.  That means they are predictable most years, and that they allow us to keep coming back to them in different light conditions.  This image, shot with transparency film, is my favorite ever tulip image.

Tulips
Copyright Andy Richards 1997

Tulips come in all sizes and shapes.  This one was made-again – with transparency film- using flash to make the background go to black.

Tulip Closeup
Copyright Andy Richards 1997

I spent a lot of time (and film) on flowers back in the film days.  The closeup is another transparency.

Oh, and that thing about my last post?  JUST KIDDING!  APRIL FOOLS! 🙂

Spring also has also gotten my “juices flowing” to get out in the field, and over the years I have found some wildflowers. Michigan’s official state wildflower is the White Trillium.  I have most often found them along the Eastern shore of Lake Michigan.  This one was shot on an overcast day with transparency film using a gold reflector to add some warm fill light.

White Trillium
copyright Andy Richards 1999

Mature White Trillium
Copyright Andy Richards 1999

As the White Trillium matures and gets ready to die, it turns purple.  I rather like the mature coloration.

Pink Lady’s Slipper Orchid
Copyright Andy Richards 1999

Northern Michigan is also known for a wild Orchid known as a “Lady’s Slipper.”  They come in pink and in yellow (which, in my experience, is much more rare).  I am also aware that there is a spotted (or painted) version and a white version.  I have not had the fortune to find these.  I know the painted variety exists in Michigan.

Yellow Lady’s Slipper Orchid
Copyright Andy Richards 1999

We are probably a month or less away from Spring blooms here in Michigan.  But this nostalgic trip into my archives has already started to generate some excitement for some Spring shooting.  Flowers, waterfalls, and other things coming back to life will likely yield some new “fodder.”  I need to get my equipment dusted off and ready.

Oh, and that thing about my last post?  JUST KIDDING.  How often do you get to post on your regular posting day (usually Sundays),  celebrate Easter, and say APRIL FOOLS!  In the words of Arnold Schwartzenegger:  “I’ll be baaaaaaack.” Happy Easter and happy Spring!

The Urge to Play Continues

Japanese Maple Leaves
Copyright Andy Richards 2013

For those who follow here, you know I have deviated lately, from my photographic depictions, in an attempt to create art.  I emphasize “attempt,” because I have never seen myself as particularly artistically talented.  The closest I have come over the years is a serious appreciation of art.  When I make a nice photographic image, I have to give a lot of  credit to nature, and a small amount of technical knowledge.  I am hopeful that continued study and experimentation will open my photographic views.  And besides, I have been having fun with this stuff.  So, however inartful the images here might be, I see myself continuing to “play” for the foreseeable future.

However inartful the images here might be, I see myself continuing to play for the foreseeable future

I have recently read Michael Freeman’s book on B&W photography: “Black & White Photography: The timeless Art of Monochrome in the Post-Digital Age.”  I gained some insight into digital conversion, but I have a lot of experimentation and learning ahead of me.

Japanese Maple Leaves
Adobe ACR Greyscale Conversion
Copyright Andy Richards 2013


My software tool box holds Photoshop CC, Painter Essentials, and the NIK Software Plugin tools.  I also have a legacy copy of OnOne Photo Suite 7.5, and just recently downloaded the newest version 10.5.  I understand that NIK (which was purchased by Google some years back) – or at least its technology – is now owned by the folks at DxO.  I am not sure what that foretells for my “now, legacy,” copy of the NIK plugins.  I surely hope they continue to be compatible with Photoshop, as I have come to depend on them for their ease of use.  For me, the”jury” is still out on the “new” On1 Suite.  It is a new interface for me, but it looks like it not only may have the same old tools, but maybe a bit more intuitive and easy to use.  I will be looking harder at it in the weeks to come.

Japanese Maple Leaves
OnOne Perfect B&W Grayscale Conversion
Copyright Andy Richards 2013

For now, one of my photographic colleagues noted that he uses the NIK Silver EFX plugin nearly exclusively for his B&W conversions.  Freeman notes in his book (which should be intuitive) that every conversion engine yields different results.  So I thought I would experiment a bit.

Japanese Maple Leaves
NIK SilverEFX Grayscale Conversion
Copyright Andy Richards 2013

Obviously, if you are going to try to do “apples to apples” comparisons, you are going to need to use the same image.  So the the images in this post may look a bit repetitive.  I used an image shot with my Sony, with a Carl Ziess lens that I like very much just as a color image.  The bokeh is nice and the colors and contrast are rich.  It prints nicely.  Being a “color photographer,” it is an image that feels like it is in my “wheelhouse.”  I certainly did not visualize this in black and white.

Japanese Maple Leaves
B&W
Copyright Andy Richards 2013

Old habits die hard, and even though Adobe Lightroom has come forward from its infancy to become an estimable photographers’ stand-alone software, I still use Photoshop as my “go-to” post-processing tool. So I started with Photoshop’s ACR raw image converter, using its B&W converter.  I shoot almost exclusively raw format images, and use ACR as my primary raw converter.  Adobe users probably know that the Lightroom converter is essentially the same engine, and I suspect that the Lightroom raw converter would yield an essentially similar B&W conversion.

I am not sure I am competent to judge how “good” these conversions are, so I will try to stick with what I “like”

For comparison, I opened a copy in standalone OnOne “Perfect Black and White” (I used version 7.5), and another using NIK Silver EFX as a Photoshop Plugin.  I am not sure I am competent to judge how “good” these conversions are, so I will try to stick with what I “like.”  And though I found them all aesthetically acceptable, the Silver EFX was most pleasing to my eye, right out of the box.  Of course another method of “conversion” would be to simply bring the image up in almost any processing program and just move the saturation slider all the way to the left.  But that doesn’t do a very good job of preserving color relationships and contrast, in my opinion.

Japanese Maple Leaves
B&W
Copyright Andy Richards 2013

Here is where the “playing” comes back into the mix.  I wanted to see what I could do with various adjustments in photoshop, with the numerous “presets” in both Silver EFX and On1 (“Perfect Black and White” has now been replaced – or maybe more accurately, merged into what is now called “On1 10 Effects”).  In the end, I thought the version above (labeled simple “B&W”) which just a bit of added contrast from the Silver EFX original version was most pleasing.  But a guy’s gotta play 🙂 so I kept going.

Japanese Maple Leaves; “colorized”
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

In last week’s post, I used a technique I had often read about, but never used, isolating a “where’s Waldo” (as my friend, Lou commented) yellow umbrella which had caught my eye when shooting the Venice Rooftops scene, even though at the time I was thinking “in color.”  Perhaps a bit sophomoric, but new to me nonetheless.  Besides, this is my blog and I can post what I want – right? 🙂  So in keeping with that same theme, I thought I would try my hand again, “colorizing” the bright scarlet leaves with water droplets in the monochrome version.  Some may note that all the prior versions are copyrighted in 2013.  That is because that is when the image was actually made.  And without getting into too much technical/gear talk, it is the monochrome version that is actually created by the camera sensor itself.  The colors are created by the RGB filter on top of the sensor.  Just saying.  🙂

I am not sure when “processing” crosses over into “creating,”

The thing is, I am not sure when “processing” crosses over into “creating,” here.  So I am going to say – arbitrarily – when I start “painting” things and doing them differently than the original image was intended (in my mind’s eye), that I am “creating.”  Hence the current copyright.  My thinking may not be wholly consistent – but then again, only about 3 people in the world even care 🙂 .

Japanese Maple Leaves
Painter Essentials Rendition
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

I just couldn’t stop there.  So I fired up my new toy, Corel Painter Essentials, and tried playing around with that.  The first version here is just “painting” the original color image with Painter Essentials.  Lots of color there. I need to learn how to make some painting adjustments in this program.  There are some areas of color contrast (like the green patch that kind of comes out of nowhere in the top middle of the frame) that are garish and perhaps jarring.  That could stand to be cloned out.  I will figure it out eventually.

Japanese Maple Leaves
Painter Essentials
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

Next, I tried to “paint” my “B&W” version in Painter Essentials.  I refined it as much at the program would allow, and it gave it a pretty photo-realistic look; perhaps a bit more gritty.  I kind of like the result.

Japanese Maple Leaves
“colorized” composite
Copyright Andy Richards 2018

I wanted to see how my “colorized” B&W version would play out in Painter Essentials.  One thing I learned was that my relatively clumsy job of painting/masking while making the colorized photographic version was really highlighted.  Painter Essentials uses the underlying photo as a source for normal image conversion/painting.  My source had the layers of color showing through, and there were remnants of green and scarlet blobbed around the image.  My path to fix this was to take both the “messy” image and the B&W image back into Photoshop, layer the B&W on top of the messy image, and paint the leaves back in again.  I am pleased with this final image.  It has more “punch” than the other colorized images, with plenty of contrast and very saturated colors (maybe Al Utzig would even say: “oversaturated” 🙂  ).

More to come. . . . .

The Rear View Mirror – 2017 in Review

Santorini, Greece
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Most years, it seems like I get to this.  2017 was again, an eventful year, photographically and with related items.  This wasn’t a year when I planned a dedicated photo trip.  But I did manage to get to some new places, and back to some old ones.  For the most part, I carried my Sony RX100 small camera, and it gave me good service.

Crystal Beach Pier
Crystal Beach, FL
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

I ended 2016, and rang in the New Year with a series of images from a small public pier, just up the road from our Florida home.

Southernmost Beach Resort
Key West, FL
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

In January, we visited a “bucket list” location; Key West.  It has held pull for me at least since I became a “Parrot Head,” and certainly after I read a couple of Jimmy Buffet’s novels.  We celebrated my January birthday at Louie’s Backyard, a rather elegant restaurant with a wonderful outdoor deck seating area, and a great menu.  The sunset was – as is common in Florida – pretty spectacular.  Key West is a destination for eating, drinking, and people watching.  I would not put it high up on the photographic destination list. 🙂

Sunset from Louie’s Backyard
Key West, FL
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Speaking of sunsets, these images got me thinking how much I have always loved both ends of the day, but generally preferred sunrise to sunset.  It spurred another post featuring some of my sunrise imagery.

Tokyo Sunrise
Copyright Andy Richards 2015

Bay Bridge Sunrise
San Francisco, CA
Copyright Andy Richards 2014

Sunrise, Hateras National Seashore, Hateras, NC copyright Andy Richards

As I went through my image library, it occurred to me that some of my images had some things in common.  For example: Shape.

Whitefish Falls
Trenary, MI
Copyright Andy Richards 2007

Rocks, Lake Superior Shoreline
Copyright Andy Richards 2004

And, Color.

Shop; Istanbul, Turkey
Copyright Andy Richards 2014

Shop; St. Maarten
Copyright Andy Richards 2012

And shape and color. 🙂

Just in time for Fall Foliage, my good friend, Carol Smith and I released our 2nd Edition of “Photographing Vermont’s Fall Foliage,”  which can be purchased via the link on this blog.  This is the cover image.

Craftsbury Common, Vermont
Copyright Andy Richards 2015

Finally, we embarked on our much anticipated, 3rd Mediterranean cruise.  The single most anticipated image for me was the opening image here of the whitewashed, blue-domed churches that dot the landscape of Santorini.  But there was so much more to see.

Ravello, Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Positano; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Amalfi; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Santorini, Greece
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Mykonos Greece
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Night Canal
Venice, Italy
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

As we ring in the New Year, I want to thank all the readers here, especially those who have the patience and perseverance to visit regularly.  I want to thank all those persons who mentor and support me in my photographic endeavors.  I want to thank my great friends (you know who you are so I won’t “out” you publicly), who traveled with us this year – we had a great time with great company.  As I said last week, I am very grateful for my blessings in life.  I wish to all, a Happy New Year, and a prosperous and successful (as you define “success”) 2018!

The Amalfi Coast

Positano, Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

This was our last port of call on our 2017 Mediterranean Cruise.  I looked forward to it, partly because the last time we were there was our shortened cruise, and we missed our tour.  While we did hire a cab to take us up the coast, our only stop that day was in the town of Amalfi.  This trip, we planned to go further up to Ravello, and then stop at Amalfi and Positano.

Ravello, Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Ravello, Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

I have a friend who spent a week in Ravello one year, and highly recommended it.  Our guide knew that the best time to get us there was early in the morning, and he took us in on back roads.  We basically had the beautiful little mountain village to ourselves that morning.  That was the last time we would see that kind of serenity for the day.

Ravello, Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Ravello, Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Ravello, Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

I just walked around and made a few images.  I can see why my friend was enchanted with this little town and why it might be very relaxing to spend a few days here.

Ravello; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Ravello; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Ravello; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Ravello; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

 

I was pretty amazed, both times I traveled here, to see how they build these communities into the the rugged mountainside.  And each of them have sweeping and beautiful views of the Mediterranean Sea.

Ravello; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

One surprise to me was how much this destination appears to have grown in popularity in 4 years.  We were there in 2013, about the same time of the year.  But this time, the crowds in Amalfi and Positano were at least double what we saw in 2013.  There is an incredible church in the middle of the square in Amalfi, that was nearly impossible to photograph because of the crowd of people.  I was able to get up over some heads and get a couple shot, and then isolate the tower.

Amalfi; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Amalfi; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

It was pretty clearly the tourists.  There were few people on the beaches, even though the temperature was well into the 80’s.

Amalfi; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Amalfi; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Positano, we were informed by our guide, is where the rich and famous go to be seen and to shop.  We spend only a few minutes here, walking down into the town among throngs of humanity, and high end retail shops.  We wanted to see if we could get a view of a church.  We weren’t really able to find a good view of it.  Most of my images were taken on the outskirts of Positano.  There road down into the city center is a kind of mult-circular, winding road.

Positano; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Positano; Amalfi Coast
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

We finished out our day – and our cruise – dining in a nice restaurant on the outskirts of Sorrento, at a family-owned restaurant known personally to our guide.  Again, we enjoyed near-exclusive dining and wonderful, fresh, local Italian cuisine.

More Santorini


There were, of course, many shots other than the blue-domed churches.  As the view from our cruise ship shows, the Island of Santorini (which is composed of 3 villages) is entirely build along the top of the volcanic rock (the Caldera) which comprises the island.  Santorini is part of the Cyclades Islands, and is approximately half-way between Athens on the mainland and the Isle of Crete

Santorini, Greece
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

In years past, the only way to the villages from the harbor was on foot, or by donkey up the steep, winding path shown to the left of the photo.  Pathways in the Village of Oia likewise show the steep foot paths down to the Agean Sea. The Greek Isles are full of white stucco buildings with very colorful accents, and often colorful flowers in addition.

Santorini, Greece
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

The pathway up into Oia from the back side had traditional Greek windmills, and shops and homes that are very colorful and picturesque.  I am continually amazed at the Mediterranean methods of building shops and dwellings into the steep cliff faces.

Santorini, Greece
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Santorini, Greece
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

Like the other Greek Islands, the inhabitants of the Island like splashes of color and particularly, colorful, blooming flowers.

Santorini, Greece
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

George took us to a spot that he believes is not well known to many tourists, but provides yet another sweeping view of the island.

Santorini, Greece
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

He also opined that, although the blue-domed church images are sought-after and iconic, he believes this image is the next “famous” Santorini shot.

Santorini, Greece
Copyright Andy Richards 2017

After seeing many gorgeous sights in Santorini, George took us to a local restaurant of the proverbial beaten path, and far from the tourist areas.  It was a beautiful, quiet, oceanfront restaurant with outstanding food and local wine.  Over the years, we have had a number of very good guides.  Indeed we have have an overwhelmingly positive experience with our guides.  But George will be one of the more memorable ones we have had, with a lively personality and a great enthusiasm for Santorini.  His quirky sense of humor can pretty easily be seen here.  I want one of these t-shirts 🙂

Santorini, Greece
Copyright Andy Richards 2017